☡┬

For frustrated writers.

Hi, I'm Grace, the main mod for this blog! Welcome to the grand experiment known as authordog. These Author Dog memes are for any writer, and if you've ever felt like you can relate to them, I've done my job. I'm happy to help with any questions you may have about writing in general, and we often have discussions about different aspects of writing, so don't be afraid to speak up. Also, we'll try to help you out if you send in some of your work to the blog - submissions are encouraged! Enjoy. And, as always, happy writing! .....................................................................
2 weeks ago• 91993 • Reblog

languageek:

The English Language Infographic found here

1 month ago• 1868 • Reblog

fictionwritingtips:

Just so you all know, you have the ability to pick and choose what writing advice you want to follow. Don’t let anyone tell you they know the right way or there are no exceptions to any rule. There’s no one way to write and be wary of anyone who tells you so.

Keep these things in mind!

1 month ago• 99510 • Reblog

Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

(via 1000wordseveryday)

(Source: wingedbeastie)

1 month ago• 42570 • Reblog

whathasbeenlost:

HEY WRITERS OF ALL KINDS AND AGES AND MAYBE EVEN DNDERS OR TABLETOP GAMERS ARE YOU READY FOR SOMETHING SUPER RAD? I HOPE SO ‘CAUSE 

image

RANDOM

image

MAP

image

GENERATOR

imageWITH

image

EDITING FEATURES AVAILABLE

IT DOESN’T REALLY DO LAND MASSES OR ANYTHING BUT IT SURE AS HELL WILL MAP THAT CITY/VILLAGE/SHIP/DUNGEON/WHATEVER THAT YOU’VE BEEN MEANING TO MAP OUT FOR YOU

SO FUCKING GO WILD

1 month ago• 75130 • Reblog

stilinskisexual:

They’ve finally figured out their real target demographic. 

1 month ago• 190234 • Reblog

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

Gary Provost (via tuongexists)

Holy crap, what just happened there… (via cyrusgabriel)

Words, man. Words.

(via bookoisseur)

(Source: qmsd)

1 month ago• 65100 • Reblog

1. Don’t think that being published will make you happy. It will for four weeks, if you are lucky. Then it’s the same old fucking shit.

2. Hemingway was fucking wrong. You shouldn’t write drunk. (See my third novel for details.)

3. Hemingway was also right. ‘The first draft of everything is shit.’

4. Never ask a publisher or agent what they are looking for. The best ones, if they are honest, don’t have a fucking clue, because the best books are the ones that seemingly come from nowhere.

5. In five years time the semi-colon is going to be nothing more than a fucking wink.

6. In five years time every fucking person on Twitter will be a writer.

7. Ignore the fucking snobs. Write that space zombie sex opera. Just give it some fucking soul.

8. If it’s not worth fucking reading, it’s not worth fucking writing. If it doesn’t make people laugh or cry or blow their fucking minds then why bother?

9. Don’t be the next Stephen King or the next Zadie Smith or the next Neil Gaiman or the next Jonathan Safran fucking Foer. Be the next fucking you.

10. Stories are fucking easy. PLOT OF EVERY BOOK EVER: Someone is looking for something. COMMERCIAL VERSION: They find it. LITERARY VERSION: They don’t find it. (That’s fucking it.)

11. No-one knows anything. Especially fucking me. Except:

12. Don’t kill off the fucking dog.

13. Oh, yeah, and lastly: write whatever you fucking want.

Matt Haig, “Some Fucking Writing Tips” (via alcantrez)

(Source: matthaig.com)

1 month ago• 198402 • Reblog
thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.
→ GENERAL
Improvement
Improve Your Writing Habits Now
5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
Improve Your Paras
Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
Writing Better Than You Normally Do
How’s My Driving?
Describing
A Description Resource
55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
Describing Skin Colors
Describing a Person: Adding Details
Emotions Vocabulary
90 Words For ‘Looks’
Be More Descriptive
Describe a Character’s Look Well
100 Words for Facial Expressions
To Show and Not To Tell
Words to Describe Facial Expressions
Describing Clothes
List of Actions
Tone, Feelings and Emotions
Masterlists
Writing Specific Characters
Character Guides
Writing Help for Writers
Ultimate Writing Resource List
Lots of RP Guides
Online Writing Resources
List of Websites to Help You Focus
Resources for Writing Bio’s
Helpful Links for Writing Help
General Writing Resources
Resources for Biography Writing
Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  Body Language
Body Language Cheat
Body Language Reference Cheat
Tips for Writers: Body Language
Types of Crying
Body Language: Mirroring
Grammar/Vocabulary
Words Instead of Walk (2)
Commonly Confused Adjectives
A Guide on Punctuation
Common Writing Mistakes
25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
Other Ways to Say..
Proofreading
300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
List of Misused Words
Words for Sex
100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
Words to Use More Often
Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
Three Self Editing Tips
Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
Synonyms for Common Words
Alternatives for ‘Smile’
Transitional Words
The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
A Case Of She Said, She Said
Writer’s Block
How to: Cure Writer’s Block
Some Tips on Writer’s Block
Got Writer’s Block?
6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block
→ APPLICATIONS
Application (Itself)
How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
How to: Make Your App Better
How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
10 Tips for Applying
Para (Sample)
Para Sample Ideas
5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
How to: Lengthen Short Para’s
Prompts
Drabble Stuff
Prompts List
Writing Prompts
Drabble Prompts
How to Get Into Character
Writing Challenges/Prompts
A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
Para Prompts & Ideas
Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
A List of Para Starters
→ GUIDES
Personalities
Angry
Bad Asses
Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Childishness
Emotional Detachment
Flirtatious
The Girl Next Door
Introverts (2)
Mean Persons (2)
Psychopaths
Party Girls
Rich (2) 
Rebels
Sarcasm
Serial Killers (2)
Shyness (2, 3)
Sluts
Villains (2)
Witt
Disorders
Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Attention Deficit Disorder
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Avoidant Personality Disorder
Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
Cotard Delusions
Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
Facitious Disorders
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Night Terrors
Kleptomania (2)
A Pyromaniac
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Psychopaths
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2) (3)
Sex Addiction (2)
Schizophrenia (2)
Sociopaths (2)
Disabilities
Aspergers Syndrome
Apathy 
Autism
Someone Blind (2)
Cancer (2, 3)
Disability
Dyslexia
Muteness (2, 3)
Stutter
Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs
Actors
Ballet Dancer (2)
Christianity
Foreigners
Gamblers
Hinduism
Hitmen
Satanism
Smokers
Stoners
Taoism
Journalists
Vegetarians
Drugs
Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
Cocaine Influence
Ecstasy Influence (2)
Heroin Use
LSD Influence
Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
Opiate Use
Locations
Australia
Boston
California (2, 3)
England/Britain (2, 3, 4, 5)
New York
Prison
London
The South (2)
Genders
Females (2)
Males (2)
Transgender People
Supernatural
Vampires
Witches (2)
Werewolves
Other
Amnesia
Children
A Death Scene
Loosing Someone (2)
Old Persons
Physical Injuries (2, 3)
Sexual Abuse (2)
Fight Scenes (2, 3, 4)
Horror
Torture
→ CREATING CHARACTERS
Biography Writing
Components of Your Biographies
Character sheet (2, 3)
Need Help With Character Creation?
How to: Draw Inspiration for Characters From Music
How to: Write a Biography (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
How to: Write a Fully Developed Character
How to: Create a Cast of Characters (2)
Writing an Original Character (2, 3)
Creating Believable Characters (2, 3)
Bio Formats (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Little Things You Can Add To Your Bios
Connections (2)
Titles
Bio Twists
Names
Female Names (2, 3, 4, 5)
Male Names (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Last Names  (2, 3, 4)
Personalities
Jung’s 16 Personality Types
Underused Character Personalities
Birth-Order: Personality Traits
The Difference Between Personality and Behavior
How to: Show a Characters Personality In a Paragraph
16 Character Traits
Underused Personalities
Personality Traits

Positive (2)
Negative (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Both (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

Habits
Addictions and Bad Habits
Bad Habits
Character Habits
Character Quirks
Phobias (2)
Secrets
300 Possible Secrets to Give Your Characters
I Bet You Didn’t Know..
Character Plots And Secrets (2)
Celebrity Secrets
Secret Masterlist
Quotes
Song Lyrics Masterlist
Songs for Biographies
Favorite Quotes: TV and Movies
Favorite Quotes: Notable Authors
Favorite Quotes: Celebrities
Favorite Quotes: Popular Books (2)
Quotes From Songs
Character Quotes
Masterlist of Bio Lyrics
Masterlist of Bio Quotes
Masterlist of Song Lyrics
Biography Lyrics
A Masterlist of Quotes
+130 Quotes
The Quotation Garden
Mary Sue’s

A Mary Sue In The Inbox
Your Character Is A Sue, Not Just A Mary Or Gary
Not Writing A Mary Sue

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING
Para Titles
100 Paragraph Titles
Para Titles - Song Title Edition (2,3)
A Whole Ton of Para Titles
350+ Song Titles
Para Titles For You (2)
Starters
How to: Create an interesting starter
How to: Make an Interesting Starter
Gif Conversations: A Guide
A Brief Guide to Starters
Interesting Gif Convesation Starters
Starters Masterlist
Gif Starter Posts
46 Interesting Gif Chat Starters
Ideas for Gif Chat Starters
Starters
Careers/Jobs
Masterlist: Jobs
Possible Careers for Characters
Artistic Occupations
Martha’s Vineyard Job Masterlist
Interesting Jobs
Locations/Settings/Activities
Para Ideas
Masterlist: Para Ideas
Top 50 Places for Starters
Writing Topics: Para Ideas
101 Date Ideas
68 Date Ideas
22 Date Ideas
Popular Places to Eat
Character Developement
Character Development Questionaire
Character Surveys
C.D. Questionaire
30 Day Character Development Meme
Character Development Questions (2)
100 Pt. Questionaire
IC and OOC Surveys
Online Test for Character Building
30 Days of Character Development
How to: Develop Characters
Get To Know Your Characters
→ ROMANCE
Romance (in general)
The Little Ways a Ship Gets Build
Roleplaying Relationships
8 Ways to Say I Love You
How to: Make a Set Ship RP Work
How to: Write a Romantic Scene
Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Relationships
Putting a Label on It
Synonyms for Love
Pregnancy (2, 3, 4, 5)
Smut
Smut Guide: Casual Sex
Smut Guide: For Beginners
How to: Write a First Time Sex Scene Romantically
How to: Smut - The Bare Bones
How to: Smut (For Virgins)
How to: Write Lesbian Smut
How to: Write Smut (2, 3)
How to: Write a Blowjob/Prepping for Smut
Smut Guides of Tumblr
Tips on Writing Sex Scenes
A Guide to Language in Smut
Domination and Submission
Making Love
A Smut Guide
Kisses
How to: Write a Kiss (2)
Different Types of Kisses
Writing Out the First Kiss
→ OTHER
Plot Writing
How to: Create the Best Plot for Your RP
How to: Create A Plot Outline in 8 Steps
How to: Write A Plot in 12 Steps
How to: Write A Quality Plot
How to: Spice Up Your Roleplay Plots
Components of Your Plot Page
Writing Up A Plot
Basics of Writing A Plot
Links for Plot Writing Help
Eight Unique Plot Ideas
Plot Twists
Situation Ideas (2, 3)
Guide to Plotting
Eras
Eras Masterlist
Everything You Need to Know Abut the 20’s
20’s Slang
Primary Sources on Ancient Civilizations
How to: Play the Greek Goddess ‘Harmonia’
How to: Roleplay In the Victorian Era
Victorian Dialogue

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.

→ GENERAL

Improvement

Describing

Masterlists

  Body Language

Grammar/Vocabulary

Writer’s Block

→ APPLICATIONS

Application (Itself)

Para (Sample)

Prompts

→ GUIDES

Personalities

Disorders

Disabilities

Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs

Drugs

Locations

Genders

Supernatural

Other

→ CREATING CHARACTERS

Biography Writing

Names

Personalities

Personality Traits
Habits

Secrets

Quotes

Mary Sue’s

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING

Para Titles

Starters

Careers/Jobs

Locations/Settings/Activities

Character Developement

→ ROMANCE

Romance (in general)

Smut

Kisses

→ OTHER

Plot Writing

Eras

1 month ago• 14664 • Reblog
komlin:

i spent 15 mins making this rather than writing

komlin:

i spent 15 mins making this rather than writing

1 month ago• 29747 • Reblog

◆ Writing a story by hand:

for-the-love-of-the-words:

Expectation:
image

Reality:
image

1 month ago• 98658 • Reblog

fred-smurf:

peel-a-potato-with-a-potato:

mystrangesilhouettes:

A look in my dream house.

The books organized by color are very satisfying to me.

i need every single one of these

(Source: benimdetamisimvardiya)

1 month ago• 533 • Reblog

yeahwriters:

image

Prompt idea by CopyKiller:

Re-write your Favorite Author

1. Pick up your favorite book. 

2. Pick a passage you love.

3. Re-write it from your own (or your character’s) perspective.

This helps with those ‘getting stuck’ moments because you’re naturally enjoying the work. The words flow a little easier.

Original post here.

Submit Your Story | Yeah Write! | Daily Prompts in Your Inbox

1 month ago• 5356 • Reblog

You should read the book that you see someone on the train reading and trying to hide that they’re laughing.

You should read the book that you see someone on the train reading and trying to hide that they’re crying.

You should read the book you find in your grandparents’ house that’s inscribed “To Ray, all my love, Christmas 1949.”

You should read books mentioned in other books.

Over at The Millions, Janet Potter, who has worked in bookstores all over the world for more than a decade, responds to Amazon’s 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime and similar rankings with a beautiful blueprint to the reading life.

Pair with Joseph Brodsky on how to develop your taste in reading.

(via explore-blog)

2 months ago• 2858 • Reblog
2 months ago• 260333 • Reblog

egberts:

wordsmythologic:

egberts:

im really pissed that palindrome isnt palindrome backwards

Ah, yes but emordnilap is a word!

An emornilap is any word that, when spelled backwards, produces another word. Examples of emordnilap pairs include:

  • desserts & stressed
  • drawer & reward
  • gateman & nametag
  • time & emit
  • laced & decal
  • regal & lager

And therefore “emordnilap palindrome” is an emordnilap palindrome.

Which I, for one, think is really frickin’ cool.

dude